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LISTING THOUGHT ARCHIVE

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Listing February - 2018
 
  Wednesday
Feb-28
Thought For The Week

'Jesus took with him Peter and James and John and led them up a high mountain where they could be alone by themselves. There in their presence he was transfigured: his clothes became dazzlingly white, whiter than any earthly bleacher could make them.' ~Mark 9:2-3

The 6 Nations Rugby game between Ireland and Wales did not disappoint at the weekend. It was really close with lots of tries and so much action. Ireland winning was definitely a stand out moment but another stand out moment for me were the penalty kicks. Over 50,000 people inside the Aviva Stadium in Dublin went completely silent for each penalty kick. There wasn't a sound, just a total hush as if the stadium was empty. It comes from respect - respect for the home team and also the away team. You could call it a Transfiguration moment, a stand out moment, a special moment.

The Gospel story of the Transfiguration makes it clear that it was a special moment for Jesus and his disciples. It was one they would never forget. When difficult, challenging and upsetting days would come, the Transfiguration would give them hope and courage.

I know the word Transfiguration is a big word and one we don't use very often ourselves but it is my own firm belief that every day has its Transfiguration moment. This is a moment that is good, positive and upbeat. It is a moment that embraces love and goodness. It is a moment that celebrates a good news story.

The world we live in today is starved of good news. Our lives can sometimes be chaotic and difficult. We need anchors or brakes to slow us down so that we can appreciate the Transfiguration moments in all our lives. We can also make a Transfiguration moment happen by nurturing and embracing a special moment in our day.

It might be a nice or comforting word someone spoke to you. It might be something as small as a thank you, a smile, a bunch of daffodils growing in your garden or a word of encouragement from someone. Hold onto your Transfiguration moment when it happens today. We need them every single day. We need them on our journey through Lent. We need them to give us hope and inspiration each day.


_________________________________________________________________________________


'The following reflection is called 'For A Reason' and is timely as we journey through these weeks of Lent. The author is unknown.

Sometimes people come into your life and you know right away that they were meant to be there, they serve some sort of purpose, teach you a lesson or help figure out who you are or who you want to become. Sometimes things happen to you and at the time they may seem horrible, painful and unfair, but in reflection you realize that without overcoming those obstacles you would have never realized your potential strength.

Everything happens for a reason. Nothing happens by chance or by means of good or bad luck. Illness, injury, love, lost moments of true greatness and sheer stupidity all occur to test the limits of your soul. Without these small tests, life would be like a smoothly paved, straight, flat road to nowhere. It would be safe and comfortable but dull and utterly pointless. If someone hurts you, betrays you or breaks your heart, forgive them, for they have helped you learn about trust and the importance of being cautious to whom you open your heart to.

If someone loves you, love them back unconditionally, not only because they love you, but because they are teaching you to love and opening your heart and eyes to things you would have never seen or felt without them. Make every day count. Appreciate every moment and take from it everything that you possibly can, for you may never be able to experience it again.

Hold your head up because you have every right to. Tell yourself you are a great individual and believe in yourself, for if you don't believe in yourself, no one else will believe in you either. You can make of your life anything you wish. Create your own life and then go out and live it.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a new photograph each day
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Feb-27
Thought For The Week

'Jesus took with him Peter and James and John and led them up a high mountain where they could be alone by themselves. There in their presence he was transfigured: his clothes became dazzlingly white, whiter than any earthly bleacher could make them.' ~Mark 9:2-3

The 6 Nations Rugby game between Ireland and Wales did not disappoint at the weekend. It was really close with lots of tries and so much action. Ireland winning was definitely a stand out moment but another stand out moment for me were the penalty kicks. Over 50,000 people inside the Aviva Stadium in Dublin went completely silent for each penalty kick. There wasn't a sound, just a total hush as if the stadium was empty. It comes from respect - respect for the home team and also the away team. You could call it a Transfiguration moment, a stand out moment, a special moment.

The Gospel story of the Transfiguration makes it clear that it was a special moment for Jesus and his disciples. It was one they would never forget. When difficult, challenging and upsetting days would come, the Transfiguration would give them hope and courage.

I know the word Transfiguration is a big word and one we don't use very often ourselves but it is my own firm belief that every day has its Transfiguration moment. This is a moment that is good, positive and upbeat. It is a moment that embraces love and goodness. It is a moment that celebrates a good news story.

The world we live in today is starved of good news. Our lives can sometimes be chaotic and difficult. We need anchors or brakes to slow us down so that we can appreciate the Transfiguration moments in all our lives. We can also make a Transfiguration moment happen by nurturing and embracing a special moment in our day.

It might be a nice or comforting word someone spoke to you. It might be something as small as a thank you, a smile, a bunch of daffodils growing in your garden or a word of encouragement from someone. Hold onto your Transfiguration moment when it happens today. We need them every single day. We need them on our journey through Lent. We need them to give us hope and inspiration each day.


_________________________________________________________________________________


'The following reflection is called 'For A Reason' and is timely as we journey through these weeks of Lent. The author is unknown.

Sometimes people come into your life and you know right away that they were meant to be there, they serve some sort of purpose, teach you a lesson or help figure out who you are or who you want to become. Sometimes things happen to you and at the time they may seem horrible, painful and unfair, but in reflection you realize that without overcoming those obstacles you would have never realized your potential strength.

Everything happens for a reason. Nothing happens by chance or by means of good or bad luck. Illness, injury, love, lost moments of true greatness and sheer stupidity all occur to test the limits of your soul. Without these small tests, life would be like a smoothly paved, straight, flat road to nowhere. It would be safe and comfortable but dull and utterly pointless. If someone hurts you, betrays you or breaks your heart, forgive them, for they have helped you learn about trust and the importance of being cautious to whom you open your heart to.

If someone loves you, love them back unconditionally, not only because they love you, but because they are teaching you to love and opening your heart and eyes to things you would have never seen or felt without them. Make every day count. Appreciate every moment and take from it everything that you possibly can, for you may never be able to experience it again.

Hold your head up because you have every right to. Tell yourself you are a great individual and believe in yourself, for if you don't believe in yourself, no one else will believe in you either. You can make of your life anything you wish. Create your own life and then go out and live it.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a new photograph each day
 
 
 
  Monday
Feb-26
Thought For The Week

'Jesus took with him Peter and James and John and led them up a high mountain where they could be alone by themselves. There in their presence he was transfigured: his clothes became dazzlingly white, whiter than any earthly bleacher could make them.' ~Mark 9:2-3

The 6 Nations Rugby game between Ireland and Wales did not disappoint at the weekend. It was really close with lots of tries and so much action. Ireland winning was definitely a stand out moment but another stand out moment for me were the penalty kicks. Over 50,000 people inside the Aviva Stadium in Dublin went completely silent for each penalty kick. There wasn't a sound, just a total hush as if the stadium was empty. It comes from respect - respect for the home team and also the away team. You could call it a Transfiguration moment, a stand out moment, a special moment.

The Gospel story of the Transfiguration makes it clear that it was a special moment for Jesus and his disciples. It was one they would never forget. When difficult, challenging and upsetting days would come, the Transfiguration would give them hope and courage.

I know the word Transfiguration is a big word and one we don't use very often ourselves but it is my own firm belief that every day has its Transfiguration moment. This is a moment that is good, positive and upbeat. It is a moment that embraces love and goodness. It is a moment that celebrates a good news story.

The world we live in today is starved of good news. Our lives can sometimes be chaotic and difficult. We need anchors or brakes to slow us down so that we can appreciate the Transfiguration moments in all our lives. We can also make a Transfiguration moment happen by nurturing and embracing a special moment in our day.

It might be a nice or comforting word someone spoke to you. It might be something as small as a thank you, a smile, a bunch of daffodils growing in your garden or a word of encouragement from someone. Hold onto your Transfiguration moment when it happens today. We need them every single day. We need them on our journey through Lent. We need them to give us hope and inspiration each day.


_________________________________________________________________________________


'The following reflection is called 'For A Reason' and is timely as we journey through these weeks of Lent. The author is unknown.

Sometimes people come into your life and you know right away that they were meant to be there, they serve some sort of purpose, teach you a lesson or help figure out who you are or who you want to become. Sometimes things happen to you and at the time they may seem horrible, painful and unfair, but in reflection you realize that without overcoming those obstacles you would have never realized your potential strength.

Everything happens for a reason. Nothing happens by chance or by means of good or bad luck. Illness, injury, love, lost moments of true greatness and sheer stupidity all occur to test the limits of your soul. Without these small tests, life would be like a smoothly paved, straight, flat road to nowhere. It would be safe and comfortable but dull and utterly pointless. If someone hurts you, betrays you or breaks your heart, forgive them, for they have helped you learn about trust and the importance of being cautious to whom you open your heart to.

If someone loves you, love them back unconditionally, not only because they love you, but because they are teaching you to love and opening your heart and eyes to things you would have never seen or felt without them. Make every day count. Appreciate every moment and take from it everything that you possibly can, for you may never be able to experience it again.

Hold your head up because you have every right to. Tell yourself you are a great individual and believe in yourself, for if you don't believe in yourself, no one else will believe in you either. You can make of your life anything you wish. Create your own life and then go out and live it.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a new photograph each day
 
 
 
  Sunday
Feb-25
Jesus said to the disciples: "You are the salt of the earth. But if salt becomes tasteless, what can make it salty again? It is good for nothing and can only be thrown out to be trampled underfoot by people." ~Matthew 5:13

Salt is a remarkable thing and is all around us. Salt is a natural mineral made up of white cube-shaped crystals composed of two elements, sodium and chlorine. It is colourless, odourless and has a distinctive and characteristic taste. It can be found underground and on the earth's surface in the dried up residues of ancient seas. But our biggest source of salt is in our seas and oceans. With an average of 26 million tonnes per cubic kilometre, sea water offers a seemingly inexhaustible supply which if extracted, would cover the world's total land mass to a depth of 35 metres. It is well known that small amounts of salt are essential for our health. Adults need less than 1 gram per day and children need even less. But as a nation we eat approximately 8.1g of salt per day, far more than we need.

If we roll the clock back to the time of Jesus, we know that salt was at the centre of daily life. Galilee had a big fishing industry and we know that lots of fish were exported to many parts of the Roman Empire. To keep them fresh they were covered in salt and with lots of salt of available this was an easy thing to do. So when Jesus used the image of salt, it would have been a relevant image to the people who were listening to Jesus.

Jesus calls us to be 'salt of the earth'. What salt does for food, we are called to do for the world, to give life 'taste'. We do this by doing our best, finding the right balance in what needs to be done and when to step back and rest. If too much salt is sprinkled it can be harmful and deadly. Likewise with life, if there are extremes of anything then it becomes counter productive. Our faith is an essential part of life. It adds something unique and essential to our everyday lives. Too little faith and we will be short and too much faith could be simply too much. Jesus encourages us to be 'salt of the earth'. We bring flavour to life through all the good things we do each day. If life becomes tasteless, it can be a difficult challenge to bring its taste back again. Getting the balance in what we bring to each day is so important and is something we can never take for granted.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Feb-24
Thought For The Week

'The following is a modern take on the Beatitudes. The author is unknown.'

Blessed are they who love the value of family and friends over everything else - the brother or sister who is always there for the family, the devoted volunteer - for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are they who grieve for the lost and who struggle to cope and continue - the single parent trying to raise a family alone, the mother or father who keep an open heart and an outreached hand to a wayward son or daughter - for they shall be comforted.

Blessed are they who find their joy in the happiness of others - the devoted parent, the dedicated teacher - for they shall inherit the earth.

Blessed are they who manage to see beyond their own interests and needs to the greater common good and their responsibility to others - for they shall be satisfied.

Blessed are they who treat classmates, co-workers and employees with respect and dignity, who remember that they have been forgiven by a compassionate God and readily extend that forgiveness and compassion to others - for they shall receive mercy.

Blessed are they who dedicate their lives in seeking God's justice and forgiveness in all things and who put themselves at the service of others to help them discover the joy of God's presence in their lives - for they shall see God.

Blessed are the peacemakers, those who possess that rare gift for bringing people together when anger and selfishness threaten to drive them apart, who readily take the first step in forgiving and being reconciled with others, who bring healing to those who have been hurt, forgotten or marginalised - for they are sons and daughters of God.

Blessed are they who are persecuted and ridiculed for what is right and just, parents, teachers and dedicated individuals who stand in opposition to false perceptions, destructive stereotypes and an ever more alienated and cynical society, who speak for the needs of children and for justice for the poor, compassion for the fallen and lost and loving support for the abused - for the reign of God is theirs.

Be glad and rejoice in the gift that is today, for your reward will be great in heaven.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a new photograph each day
 
 
 
  Friday
Feb-23
Thought For The Week

'The following is a modern take on the Beatitudes. The author is unknown.'

Blessed are they who love the value of family and friends over everything else - the brother or sister who is always there for the family, the devoted volunteer - for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are they who grieve for the lost and who struggle to cope and continue - the single parent trying to raise a family alone, the mother or father who keep an open heart and an outreached hand to a wayward son or daughter - for they shall be comforted.

Blessed are they who find their joy in the happiness of others - the devoted parent, the dedicated teacher - for they shall inherit the earth.

Blessed are they who manage to see beyond their own interests and needs to the greater common good and their responsibility to others - for they shall be satisfied.

Blessed are they who treat classmates, co-workers and employees with respect and dignity, who remember that they have been forgiven by a compassionate God and readily extend that forgiveness and compassion to others - for they shall receive mercy.

Blessed are they who dedicate their lives in seeking God's justice and forgiveness in all things and who put themselves at the service of others to help them discover the joy of God's presence in their lives - for they shall see God.

Blessed are the peacemakers, those who possess that rare gift for bringing people together when anger and selfishness threaten to drive them apart, who readily take the first step in forgiving and being reconciled with others, who bring healing to those who have been hurt, forgotten or marginalised - for they are sons and daughters of God.

Blessed are they who are persecuted and ridiculed for what is right and just, parents, teachers and dedicated individuals who stand in opposition to false perceptions, destructive stereotypes and an ever more alienated and cynical society, who speak for the needs of children and for justice for the poor, compassion for the fallen and lost and loving support for the abused - for the reign of God is theirs.

Be glad and rejoice in the gift that is today, for your reward will be great in heaven.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a new photograph each day
 
 
 
  Thursday
Feb-22
Thought For The Week

'The following is a modern take on the Beatitudes. The author is unknown.'

Blessed are they who love the value of family and friends over everything else - the brother or sister who is always there for the family, the devoted volunteer - for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are they who grieve for the lost and who struggle to cope and continue - the single parent trying to raise a family alone, the mother or father who keep an open heart and an outreached hand to a wayward son or daughter - for they shall be comforted.

Blessed are they who find their joy in the happiness of others - the devoted parent, the dedicated teacher - for they shall inherit the earth.

Blessed are they who manage to see beyond their own interests and needs to the greater common good and their responsibility to others - for they shall be satisfied.

Blessed are they who treat classmates, co-workers and employees with respect and dignity, who remember that they have been forgiven by a compassionate God and readily extend that forgiveness and compassion to others - for they shall receive mercy.

Blessed are they who dedicate their lives in seeking God's justice and forgiveness in all things and who put themselves at the service of others to help them discover the joy of God's presence in their lives - for they shall see God.

Blessed are the peacemakers, those who possess that rare gift for bringing people together when anger and selfishness threaten to drive them apart, who readily take the first step in forgiving and being reconciled with others, who bring healing to those who have been hurt, forgotten or marginalised - for they are sons and daughters of God.

Blessed are they who are persecuted and ridiculed for what is right and just, parents, teachers and dedicated individuals who stand in opposition to false perceptions, destructive stereotypes and an ever more alienated and cynical society, who speak for the needs of children and for justice for the poor, compassion for the fallen and lost and loving support for the abused - for the reign of God is theirs.

Be glad and rejoice in the gift that is today, for your reward will be great in heaven.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a new photograph each day
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Feb-21
Thought For The Week

'The following is a modern take on the Beatitudes. The author is unknown.'

Blessed are they who love the value of family and friends over everything else - the brother or sister who is always there for the family, the devoted volunteer - for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are they who grieve for the lost and who struggle to cope and continue - the single parent trying to raise a family alone, the mother or father who keep an open heart and an outreached hand to a wayward son or daughter - for they shall be comforted.

Blessed are they who find their joy in the happiness of others - the devoted parent, the dedicated teacher - for they shall inherit the earth.

Blessed are they who manage to see beyond their own interests and needs to the greater common good and their responsibility to others - for they shall be satisfied.

Blessed are they who treat classmates, co-workers and employees with respect and dignity, who remember that they have been forgiven by a compassionate God and readily extend that forgiveness and compassion to others - for they shall receive mercy.

Blessed are they who dedicate their lives in seeking God's justice and forgiveness in all things and who put themselves at the service of others to help them discover the joy of God's presence in their lives - for they shall see God.

Blessed are the peacemakers, those who possess that rare gift for bringing people together when anger and selfishness threaten to drive them apart, who readily take the first step in forgiving and being reconciled with others, who bring healing to those who have been hurt, forgotten or marginalised - for they are sons and daughters of God.

Blessed are they who are persecuted and ridiculed for what is right and just, parents, teachers and dedicated individuals who stand in opposition to false perceptions, destructive stereotypes and an ever more alienated and cynical society, who speak for the needs of children and for justice for the poor, compassion for the fallen and lost and loving support for the abused - for the reign of God is theirs.

Be glad and rejoice in the gift that is today, for your reward will be great in heaven.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a new photograph each day
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Feb-20
Thought For The Week

'The following is a modern take on the Beatitudes. The author is unknown.'

Blessed are they who love the value of family and friends over everything else - the brother or sister who is always there for the family, the devoted volunteer - for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are they who grieve for the lost and who struggle to cope and continue - the single parent trying to raise a family alone, the mother or father who keep an open heart and an outreached hand to a wayward son or daughter - for they shall be comforted.

Blessed are they who find their joy in the happiness of others - the devoted parent, the dedicated teacher - for they shall inherit the earth.

Blessed are they who manage to see beyond their own interests and needs to the greater common good and their responsibility to others - for they shall be satisfied.

Blessed are they who treat classmates, co-workers and employees with respect and dignity, who remember that they have been forgiven by a compassionate God and readily extend that forgiveness and compassion to others - for they shall receive mercy.

Blessed are they who dedicate their lives in seeking God's justice and forgiveness in all things and who put themselves at the service of others to help them discover the joy of God's presence in their lives - for they shall see God.

Blessed are the peacemakers, those who possess that rare gift for bringing people together when anger and selfishness threaten to drive them apart, who readily take the first step in forgiving and being reconciled with others, who bring healing to those who have been hurt, forgotten or marginalised - for they are sons and daughters of God.

Blessed are they who are persecuted and ridiculed for what is right and just, parents, teachers and dedicated individuals who stand in opposition to false perceptions, destructive stereotypes and an ever more alienated and cynical society, who speak for the needs of children and for justice for the poor, compassion for the fallen and lost and loving support for the abused - for the reign of God is theirs.

Be glad and rejoice in the gift that is today, for your reward will be great in heaven.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a new photograph each day
 
 
 
  Monday
Feb-19
Thought For The Week

'The following is a modern take on the Beatitudes. The author is unknown.'

Blessed are they who love the value of family and friends over everything else - the brother or sister who is always there for the family, the devoted volunteer - for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are they who grieve for the lost and who struggle to cope and continue - the single parent trying to raise a family alone, the mother or father who keep an open heart and an outreached hand to a wayward son or daughter - for they shall be comforted.

Blessed are they who find their joy in the happiness of others - the devoted parent, the dedicated teacher - for they shall inherit the earth.

Blessed are they who manage to see beyond their own interests and needs to the greater common good and their responsibility to others - for they shall be satisfied.

Blessed are they who treat classmates, co-workers and employees with respect and dignity, who remember that they have been forgiven by a compassionate God and readily extend that forgiveness and compassion to others - for they shall receive mercy.

Blessed are they who dedicate their lives in seeking God's justice and forgiveness in all things and who put themselves at the service of others to help them discover the joy of God's presence in their lives - for they shall see God.

Blessed are the peacemakers, those who possess that rare gift for bringing people together when anger and selfishness threaten to drive them apart, who readily take the first step in forgiving and being reconciled with others, who bring healing to those who have been hurt, forgotten or marginalised - for they are sons and daughters of God.

Blessed are they who are persecuted and ridiculed for what is right and just, parents, teachers and dedicated individuals who stand in opposition to false perceptions, destructive stereotypes and an ever more alienated and cynical society, who speak for the needs of children and for justice for the poor, compassion for the fallen and lost and loving support for the abused - for the reign of God is theirs.

Be glad and rejoice in the gift that is today, for your reward will be great in heaven.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a new photograph updated each day
 
 
 
  Sunday
Feb-18
Thought For Today is by Jane Mellett called 'Operation Transformation'

The first Sunday of Lent - I love Lent, it's a great season where we can get in 'transformation' mode. Regardless of whether or not someone is still 'practicing' their faith, people still seem to get on board with Lent. We usually give something up, but remember it's not simply about weight loss or getting fit. By doing these things we are trying to make room for something deeper. It's a spring cleaning sort of time.

What needs clearing out in my life so that I can make more room for God? Or often do we need to make more room for what God has planned for us? We can get stuck, especially when we are comfortable and don't really want too much to change. But without change we can't grow and things fast become stale in our lives. God is always urging us on because God knows just what possibilities there are for each of us.

So Lent might be a time where in giving up something or taking on something, we make space for something new. The gospel today is short and sweet - Jesus is sent into the desert and we too are invited into a desert time. Deserts are interesting places which can allow us to reflect, give ourselves space and we should not be afraid because as the gospel tells us clearly today, it is a Spirit led desert. God is with us in this desert. So enjoy Lent, embrace it. How we make use of this time determines what will be.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Feb-17
Thought For The Week

'Ash Wednesday is a reminder of our humanity' ~Jenni Friedman

Last Wednesday (Feb 14th) was a rare double celebration, Ash Wednesday and Valentine's Day. The last time this happened was 73 years ago back in 1945. Interestingly the next time it will happen is much sooner, in 2024 and 2029. It won't happen for a long time again after those years. Valentine's Day is a fixed day on the calendar but Ash Wednesday keeps moving and is decided by the date Easter Sunday falls on. Easter Sunday is always the Sunday after the first full moon after the Spring Equinox which is March 21st.

So a brief word about both celebrations. Ash Wednesday is a day that spiritually touches lots of people. There is something about getting a rub of dirty ashes onto our foreheads that has got huge appeal. So why do we put dirty ashes onto our foreheads on Ash Wednesday? A dark bowl of ashes may look stark and depressing but spiritually they can take on a new meaning. They are an outward sign that we're mortal, fragile and merely pilgrims passing through this world.

We also take the ashes to remind us that we are part of the creation of God and that we're also equal in God's eyes. They are ashes of hope reminding others that we're willing to do something positive in our spiritual lives. Side by side with Valentine's Day the ashes remind us of love and how every little gesture of love leaves a significant mark where ever we go.

Valentine's Day as we know is often hyped up into a commercial day: that you must give a card to someone, you must buy expensive flowers and you must go to a fancy restaurant to celebrate. The significant small meaningful ways in which it can be celebrated are often the best. When you take away all the trimmings that go with Valentine's Day, you are left with that precious gift called love. It is not just limited to romantic love. It's a day that celebrates every moment of love. If we say God is love then every moment of love brings with it an energy and a uniqueness that can't be found anywhere else.

It is we ourselves who do our best to limit the effects of love. Life knocks us and hurts us from time to time and we retreat into our hiding places. But love invites us back out of our darkness and uncertainties. Like many gifts that are given to us each day, we tend to take love for granted. Valentine's Day is a day to give thanks to God for this most beautiful gift that has endless power to create, heal and shape us into the beautiful person that we are.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a new photograph updated each day
 
 
 
  Friday
Feb-16
Thought For The Week

'Ash Wednesday is a reminder of our humanity' ~Jenni Friedman

Last Wednesday (Feb 14th) was a rare double celebration, Ash Wednesday and Valentine's Day. The last time this happened was 73 years ago back in 1945. Interestingly the next time it will happen is much sooner, in 2024 and 2029. It won't happen for a long time again after those years. Valentine's Day is a fixed day on the calendar but Ash Wednesday keeps moving and is decided by the date Easter Sunday falls on. Easter Sunday is always the Sunday after the first full moon after the Spring Equinox which is March 21st.

So a brief word about both celebrations. Ash Wednesday is a day that spiritually touches lots of people. There is something about getting a rub of dirty ashes onto our foreheads that has got huge appeal. So why do we put dirty ashes onto our foreheads on Ash Wednesday? A dark bowl of ashes may look stark and depressing but spiritually they can take on a new meaning. They are an outward sign that we're mortal, fragile and merely pilgrims passing through this world.

We also take the ashes to remind us that we are part of the creation of God and that we're also equal in God's eyes. They are ashes of hope reminding others that we're willing to do something positive in our spiritual lives. Side by side with Valentine's Day the ashes remind us of love and how every little gesture of love leaves a significant mark where ever we go.

Valentine's Day as we know is often hyped up into a commercial day: that you must give a card to someone, you must buy expensive flowers and you must go to a fancy restaurant to celebrate. The significant small meaningful ways in which it can be celebrated are often the best. When you take away all the trimmings that go with Valentine's Day, you are left with that precious gift called love. It is not just limited to romantic love. It's a day that celebrates every moment of love. If we say God is love then every moment of love brings with it an energy and a uniqueness that can't be found anywhere else.

It is we ourselves who do our best to limit the effects of love. Life knocks us and hurts us from time to time and we retreat into our hiding places. But love invites us back out of our darkness and uncertainties. Like many gifts that are given to us each day, we tend to take love for granted. Valentine's Day is a day to give thanks to God for this most beautiful gift that has endless power to create, heal and shape us into the beautiful person that we are.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a new photograph updated each day
 
 
 
  Thursday
Feb-15
Thought For The Week

'Ash Wednesday is a reminder of our humanity' ~Jenni Friedman

Yesterday Wednesday (Feb 14th) was a rare double celebration, Ash Wednesday and Valentine's Day. The last time this happened was 73 years ago back in 1945. Interestingly the next time it will happen is much sooner, in 2024 and 2029. It won't happen for a long time again after those years. Valentine's Day is a fixed day on the calendar but Ash Wednesday keeps moving and is decided by the date Easter Sunday falls on. Easter Sunday is always the Sunday after the first full moon after the Spring Equinox which is March 21st.

So a brief word about both celebrations. Ash Wednesday is a day that spiritually touches lots of people. There is something about getting a rub of dirty ashes onto our foreheads that has got huge appeal. So why do we put dirty ashes onto our foreheads on Ash Wednesday? A dark bowl of ashes may look stark and depressing but spiritually they can take on a new meaning. They are an outward sign that we're mortal, fragile and merely pilgrims passing through this world.

We also take the ashes to remind us that we are part of the creation of God and that we're also equal in God's eyes. They are ashes of hope reminding others that we're willing to do something positive in our spiritual lives. Side by side with Valentine's Day the ashes remind us of love and how every little gesture of love leaves a significant mark where ever we go.

Valentine's Day as we know is often hyped up into a commercial day: that you must give a card to someone, you must buy expensive flowers and you must go to a fancy restaurant to celebrate. The significant small meaningful ways in which it can be celebrated are often the best. When you take away all the trimmings that go with Valentine's Day, you are left with that precious gift called love. It is not just limited to romantic love. It's a day that celebrates every moment of love. If we say God is love then every moment of love brings with it an energy and a uniqueness that can't be found anywhere else.

It is we ourselves who do our best to limit the effects of love. Life knocks us and hurts us from time to time and we retreat into our hiding places. But love invites us back out of our darkness and uncertainties. Like many gifts that are given to us each day, we tend to take love for granted. Valentine's Day is a day to give thanks to God for this most beautiful gift that has endless power to create, heal and shape us into the beautiful person that we are.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a new photograph updated each day
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Feb-14
Thought For The Week

'Ash Wednesday is a reminder of our humanity' ~Jenni Friedman

Today Wednesday (Feb 14th) is a rare double celebration, Ash Wednesday and Valentine's Day. The last time this happened was 73 years ago back in 1945. Interestingly the next time it will happen is much sooner, in 2024 and 2029. It won't happen for a long time again after those years. Valentine's Day is a fixed day on the calendar but Ash Wednesday keeps moving and is decided by the date Easter Sunday falls on. Easter Sunday is always the Sunday after the first full moon after the Spring Equinox which is March 21st.

So a brief word about both celebrations. Ash Wednesday is a day that spiritually touches lots of people. There is something about getting a rub of dirty ashes onto our foreheads that has got huge appeal. So why do we put dirty ashes onto our foreheads on Ash Wednesday? A dark bowl of ashes may look stark and depressing but spiritually they can take on a new meaning. They are an outward sign that we're mortal, fragile and merely pilgrims passing through this world.

We also take the ashes to remind us that we are part of the creation of God and that we're also equal in God's eyes. They are ashes of hope reminding others that we're willing to do something positive in our spiritual lives. Side by side with Valentine's Day the ashes remind us of love and how every little gesture of love leaves a significant mark where ever we go.

Valentine's Day as we know is often hyped up into a commercial day: that you must give a card to someone, you must buy expensive flowers and you must go to a fancy restaurant to celebrate. The significant small meaningful ways in which it can be celebrated are often the best. When you take away all the trimmings that go with Valentine's Day, you are left with that precious gift called love. It is not just limited to romantic love. It's a day that celebrates every moment of love. If we say God is love then every moment of love brings with it an energy and a uniqueness that can't be found anywhere else.

It is we ourselves who do our best to limit the effects of love. Life knocks us and hurts us from time to time and we retreat into our hiding places. But love invites us back out of our darkness and uncertainties. Like many gifts that are given to us each day, we tend to take love for granted. Valentine's Day is a day to give thanks to God for this most beautiful gift that has endless power to create, heal and shape us into the beautiful person that we are.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a new photograph updated each day
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Feb-13
Thought For The Week

'Ash Wednesday is a reminder of our humanity' ~Jenni Friedman

Tomorrow Wednesday (Feb 14th) is a rare double celebration, Ash Wednesday and Valentine's Day. The last time this happened was 73 years ago back in 1945. Interestingly the next time it will happen is much sooner, in 2024 and 2029. It won't happen for a long time again after those years. Valentine's Day is a fixed day on the calendar but Ash Wednesday keeps moving and is decided by the date Easter Sunday falls on. Easter Sunday is always the Sunday after the first full moon after the Spring Equinox which is March 21st.

So a brief word about both celebrations. Ash Wednesday is a day that spiritually touches lots of people. There is something about getting a rub of dirty ashes onto our foreheads that has got huge appeal. So why do we put dirty ashes onto our foreheads on Ash Wednesday? A dark bowl of ashes may look stark and depressing but spiritually they can take on a new meaning. They are an outward sign that we're mortal, fragile and merely pilgrims passing through this world.

We also take the ashes to remind us that we are part of the creation of God and that we're also equal in God's eyes. They are ashes of hope reminding others that we're willing to do something positive in our spiritual lives. Side by side with Valentine's Day the ashes remind us of love and how every little gesture of love leaves a significant mark where ever we go.

Valentine's Day as we know is often hyped up into a commercial day: that you must give a card to someone, you must buy expensive flowers and you must go to a fancy restaurant to celebrate. The significant small meaningful ways in which it can be celebrated are often the best. When you take away all the trimmings that go with Valentine's Day, you are left with that precious gift called love. It is not just limited to romantic love. It's a day that celebrates every moment of love. If we say God is love then every moment of love brings with it an energy and a uniqueness that can't be found anywhere else.

It is we ourselves who do our best to limit the effects of love. Life knocks us and hurts us from time to time and we retreat into our hiding places. But love invites us back out of our darkness and uncertainties. Like many gifts that are given to us each day, we tend to take love for granted. Valentine's Day is a day to give thanks to God for this most beautiful gift that has endless power to create, heal and shape us into the beautiful person that we are.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a new photograph updated each day
 
 
 
  Monday
Feb-12
Thought For The Week

'Ash Wednesday is a reminder of our humanity' ~Jenni Friedman

Next Wednesday (Feb 14th) is a rare double celebration, Ash Wednesday and Valentine's Day. The last time this happened was 73 years ago back in 1945. Interestingly the next time it will happen is much sooner, in 2024 and 2029. It won't happen for a long time again after those years. Valentine's Day is a fixed day on the calendar but Ash Wednesday keeps moving and is decided by the date Easter Sunday falls on. Easter Sunday is always the Sunday after the first full moon after the Spring Equinox which is March 21st.

So a brief word about both celebrations. Ash Wednesday is a day that spiritually touches lots of people. There is something about getting a rub of dirty ashes onto our foreheads that has got huge appeal. So why do we put dirty ashes onto our foreheads on Ash Wednesday? A dark bowl of ashes may look stark and depressing but spiritually they can take on a new meaning. They are an outward sign that we're mortal, fragile and merely pilgrims passing through this world.

We also take the ashes to remind us that we are part of the creation of God and that we're also equal in God's eyes. They are ashes of hope reminding others that we're willing to do something positive in our spiritual lives. Side by side with Valentine's Day the ashes remind us of love and how every little gesture of love leaves a significant mark where ever we go.

Valentine's Day as we know is often hyped up into a commercial day: that you must give a card to someone, you must buy expensive flowers and you must go to a fancy restaurant to celebrate. The significant small meaningful ways in which it can be celebrated are often the best. When you take away all the trimmings that go with Valentine's Day, you are left with that precious gift called love. It is not just limited to romantic love. It's a day that celebrates every moment of love. If we say God is love then every moment of love brings with it an energy and a uniqueness that can't be found anywhere else.

It is we ourselves who do our best to limit the effects of love. Life knocks us and hurts us from time to time and we retreat into our hiding places. But love invites us back out of our darkness and uncertainties. Like many gifts that are given to us each day, we tend to take love for granted. Valentine's Day is a day to give thanks to God for this most beautiful gift that has endless power to create, heal and shape us into the beautiful person that we are.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a new photograph updated each day
 
 
 
  Sunday
Feb-11
'A lot of people say they want to get out of pain, and I'm sure that's true, but they aren't willing to make healing a high priority. They aren't willing to look inside to see the source of their pain in order to deal with it.' ~Lindsay Wagner

Today (Feb 11th) is the feast of Our Lady of Lourdes. It is a day set aside to celebrate the anniversary of the apparitions witnessed by 14 year old Bernadette Soubirous and it also marks world day for sick people. Five million pilgrims visit Lourdes each year. Anyone who has been there will know it's a significant and special place. Love bubbles everywhere in Lourdes. Its effects are felt by everyone. It is contagious, life giving, refreshing and so alive. So many prayers are said in Lourdes for those who are sick. These prayers are heartfelt, special and beautiful. But they are not just confined to Lourdes.

Today in every part of the world there will be prayers for those who are sick. It happens every day but today Saturday it is top of the list of priorities. We all can play our part. Today is a day to make sure that God's greatest medicine called love gets shared. All of us are instruments of God's healing love. We pray today for all who are sick and we include doctors, nurses, carers and anyone who needs our prayers on this special day.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Feb-10
Thought For The Week

"It is not a race to the top of the mountain. It never is. It is the pace you set and the step you take that gets you there. The changing landscape on every mountain determines the climb. Some paths are gentle and take little effort, other paths are difficult and testing" ~Therese Keville

Mountain and hill climbing has become hugely popular in recent years. Much of it happens within a group or club. There is a great sense of achievement, friendships are made and the health benefits of course make it all worthwhile. We sometimes hear of mountain rescue teams who have to go in search of someone who has fallen or has got lost up some high mountain. Carrauntoohil in Co. Kerry is often mentioned. Usually these trips were done with little planning, those who were rescued did not carry enough warm clothes, who ignored weather warnings and who lacked experience. They would also have decided not to travel with a group or team leader who knew the safest way and safest path up these difficult mountains.

Life can sometimes be like climbing a mountain too. Sometimes the challenges seem to tower up over us and it all seems too much. But every mountain will have its paths. The ones that go straight up are not always the best option to take. The paths that wind their way around and up and over are always the best ones to take. The seemingly quickest option is not always the best one. The pathways that gently wind their way up, definitely take much longer but are worth it in the end. There is also more time to enjoy the views too.

Our Scripture readings remind us how God journeys with us along these pathways too, guiding us, supporting us and encouraging us. Scripture is a collection of many stories. Some of them make little sense to us and some really resonate with our story and make much sense. William Sloane sums it up well by reflectively saying: "God provides minimum protection and maximum support." We sometimes ask why God allows suffering, tragedies, sickness and dreadfully sad stories to happen. We then feebly try and explain it all by saying it is God's will. But we can't go there. Great theologians tell us that we cannot hold God responsible for the evil and pain in our world. Bad things happen and will continue to happen. But they are not the work of God.

In a random universe, God's design is to be present with us and support us through the troubles we face. We can turn to God with confidence who will help us to be strong and who will give us courage through what is difficult and impossible. Even when we make bad choices or mistakes, God will never leave us alone. Whatever path you are on today, know that the energy of God is there too to gently guide, direct and help you with your life journey.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a new photograph updated each day
 
 
 
  Friday
Feb-09
Thought For The Week

"It is not a race to the top of the mountain. It never is. It is the pace you set and the step you take that gets you there. The changing landscape on every mountain determines the climb. Some paths are gentle and take little effort, other paths are difficult and testing" ~Therese Keville

Mountain and hill climbing has become hugely popular in recent years. Much of it happens within a group or club. There is a great sense of achievement, friendships are made and the health benefits of course make it all worthwhile. We sometimes hear of mountain rescue teams who have to go in search of someone who has fallen or has got lost up some high mountain. Carrauntoohil in Co. Kerry is often mentioned. Usually these trips were done with little planning, those who were rescued did not carry enough warm clothes, who ignored weather warnings and who lacked experience. They would also have decided not to travel with a group or team leader who knew the safest way and safest path up these difficult mountains.

Life can sometimes be like climbing a mountain too. Sometimes the challenges seem to tower up over us and it all seems too much. But every mountain will have its paths. The ones that go straight up are not always the best option to take. The paths that wind their way around and up and over are always the best ones to take. The seemingly quickest option is not always the best one. The pathways that gently wind their way up, definitely take much longer but are worth it in the end. There is also more time to enjoy the views too.

Our Scripture readings remind us how God journeys with us along these pathways too, guiding us, supporting us and encouraging us. Scripture is a collection of many stories. Some of them make little sense to us and some really resonate with our story and make much sense. William Sloane sums it up well by reflectively saying: "God provides minimum protection and maximum support." We sometimes ask why God allows suffering, tragedies, sickness and dreadfully sad stories to happen. We then feebly try and explain it all by saying it is God's will. But we can't go there. Great theologians tell us that we cannot hold God responsible for the evil and pain in our world. Bad things happen and will continue to happen. But they are not the work of God.

In a random universe, God's design is to be present with us and support us through the troubles we face. We can turn to God with confidence who will help us to be strong and who will give us courage through what is difficult and impossible. Even when we make bad choices or mistakes, God will never leave us alone. Whatever path you are on today, know that the energy of God is there too to gently guide, direct and help you with your life journey.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a new photograph updated each day
 
 
 
  Thursday
Feb-08
Thought For The Week

"It is not a race to the top of the mountain. It never is. It is the pace you set and the step you take that gets you there. The changing landscape on every mountain determines the climb. Some paths are gentle and take little effort, other paths are difficult and testing" ~Therese Keville

Mountain and hill climbing has become hugely popular in recent years. Much of it happens within a group or club. There is a great sense of achievement, friendships are made and the health benefits of course make it all worthwhile. We sometimes hear of mountain rescue teams who have to go in search of someone who has fallen or has got lost up some high mountain. Carrauntoohil in Co. Kerry is often mentioned. Usually these trips were done with little planning, those who were rescued did not carry enough warm clothes, who ignored weather warnings and who lacked experience. They would also have decided not to travel with a group or team leader who knew the safest way and safest path up these difficult mountains.

Life can sometimes be like climbing a mountain too. Sometimes the challenges seem to tower up over us and it all seems too much. But every mountain will have its paths. The ones that go straight up are not always the best option to take. The paths that wind their way around and up and over are always the best ones to take. The seemingly quickest option is not always the best one. The pathways that gently wind their way up, definitely take much longer but are worth it in the end. There is also more time to enjoy the views too.

Our Scripture readings remind us how God journeys with us along these pathways too, guiding us, supporting us and encouraging us. Scripture is a collection of many stories. Some of them make little sense to us and some really resonate with our story and make much sense. William Sloane sums it up well by reflectively saying: "God provides minimum protection and maximum support." We sometimes ask why God allows suffering, tragedies, sickness and dreadfully sad stories to happen. We then feebly try and explain it all by saying it is God's will. But we can't go there. Great theologians tell us that we cannot hold God responsible for the evil and pain in our world. Bad things happen and will continue to happen. But they are not the work of God.

In a random universe, God's design is to be present with us and support us through the troubles we face. We can turn to God with confidence who will help us to be strong and who will give us courage through what is difficult and impossible. Even when we make bad choices or mistakes, God will never leave us alone. Whatever path you are on today, know that the energy of God is there too to gently guide, direct and help you with your life journey.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a new photograph updated each day
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Feb-07
Thought For The Week

"It is not a race to the top of the mountain. It never is. It is the pace you set and the step you take that gets you there. The changing landscape on every mountain determines the climb. Some paths are gentle and take little effort, other paths are difficult and testing" ~Therese Keville

Mountain and hill climbing has become hugely popular in recent years. Much of it happens within a group or club. There is a great sense of achievement, friendships are made and the health benefits of course make it all worthwhile. We sometimes hear of mountain rescue teams who have to go in search of someone who has fallen or has got lost up some high mountain. Carrauntoohil in Co. Kerry is often mentioned. Usually these trips were done with little planning, those who were rescued did not carry enough warm clothes, who ignored weather warnings and who lacked experience. They would also have decided not to travel with a group or team leader who knew the safest way and safest path up these difficult mountains.

Life can sometimes be like climbing a mountain too. Sometimes the challenges seem to tower up over us and it all seems too much. But every mountain will have its paths. The ones that go straight up are not always the best option to take. The paths that wind their way around and up and over are always the best ones to take. The seemingly quickest option is not always the best one. The pathways that gently wind their way up, definitely take much longer but are worth it in the end. There is also more time to enjoy the views too.

Our Scripture readings remind us how God journeys with us along these pathways too, guiding us, supporting us and encouraging us. Scripture is a collection of many stories. Some of them make little sense to us and some really resonate with our story and make much sense. William Sloane sums it up well by reflectively saying: "God provides minimum protection and maximum support." We sometimes ask why God allows suffering, tragedies, sickness and dreadfully sad stories to happen. We then feebly try and explain it all by saying it is God's will. But we can't go there. Great theologians tell us that we cannot hold God responsible for the evil and pain in our world. Bad things happen and will continue to happen. But they are not the work of God.

In a random universe, God's design is to be present with us and support us through the troubles we face. We can turn to God with confidence who will help us to be strong and who will give us courage through what is difficult and impossible. Even when we make bad choices or mistakes, God will never leave us alone. Whatever path you are on today, know that the energy of God is there too to gently guide, direct and help you with your life journey.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a new photograph updated each day
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Feb-06
Thought For The Week

"It is not a race to the top of the mountain. It never is. It is the pace you set and the step you take that gets you there. The changing landscape on every mountain determines the climb. Some paths are gentle and take little effort, other paths are difficult and testing" ~Therese Keville

Mountain and hill climbing has become hugely popular in recent years. Much of it happens within a group or club. There is a great sense of achievement, friendships are made and the health benefits of course make it all worthwhile. We sometimes hear of mountain rescue teams who have to go in search of someone who has fallen or has got lost up some high mountain. Carrauntoohil in Co. Kerry is often mentioned. Usually these trips were done with little planning, those who were rescued did not carry enough warm clothes, who ignored weather warnings and who lacked experience. They would also have decided not to travel with a group or team leader who knew the safest way and safest path up these difficult mountains.

Life can sometimes be like climbing a mountain too. Sometimes the challenges seem to tower up over us and it all seems too much. But every mountain will have its paths. The ones that go straight up are not always the best option to take. The paths that wind their way around and up and over are always the best ones to take. The seemingly quickest option is not always the best one. The pathways that gently wind their way up, definitely take much longer but are worth it in the end. There is also more time to enjoy the views too.

Our Scripture readings remind us how God journeys with us along these pathways too, guiding us, supporting us and encouraging us. Scripture is a collection of many stories. Some of them make little sense to us and some really resonate with our story and make much sense. William Sloane sums it up well by reflectively saying: "God provides minimum protection and maximum support." We sometimes ask why God allows suffering, tragedies, sickness and dreadfully sad stories to happen. We then feebly try and explain it all by saying it is God's will. But we can't go there. Great theologians tell us that we cannot hold God responsible for the evil and pain in our world. Bad things happen and will continue to happen. But they are not the work of God.

In a random universe, God's design is to be present with us and support us through the troubles we face. We can turn to God with confidence who will help us to be strong and who will give us courage through what is difficult and impossible. Even when we make bad choices or mistakes, God will never leave us alone. Whatever path you are on today, know that the energy of God is there too to gently guide, direct and help you with your life journey.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a new photograph updated each day
 
 
 
  Monday
Feb-05
Thought For The Week

"It is not a race to the top of the mountain. It never is. It is the pace you set and the step you take that gets you there. The changing landscape on every mountain determines the climb. Some paths are gentle and take little effort, other paths are difficult and testing" ~Therese Keville

Mountain and hill climbing has become hugely popular in recent years. Much of it happens within a group or club. There is a great sense of achievement, friendships are made and the health benefits of course make it all worthwhile. We sometimes hear of mountain rescue teams who have to go in search of someone who has fallen or has got lost up some high mountain. Carrauntoohil in Co. Kerry is often mentioned. Usually these trips were done with little planning, those who were rescued did not carry enough warm clothes, who ignored weather warnings and who lacked experience. They would also have decided not to travel with a group or team leader who knew the safest way and safest path up these difficult mountains.

Life can sometimes be like climbing a mountain too. Sometimes the challenges seem to tower up over us and it all seems too much. But every mountain will have its paths. The ones that go straight up are not always the best option to take. The paths that wind their way around and up and over are always the best ones to take. The seemingly quickest option is not always the best one. The pathways that gently wind their way up, definitely take much longer but are worth it in the end. There is also more time to enjoy the views too.

Our Scripture readings remind us how God journeys with us along these pathways too, guiding us, supporting us and encouraging us. Scripture is a collection of many stories. Some of them make little sense to us and some really resonate with our story and make much sense. William Sloane sums it up well by reflectively saying: "God provides minimum protection and maximum support." We sometimes ask why God allows suffering, tragedies, sickness and dreadfully sad stories to happen. We then feebly try and explain it all by saying it is God's will. But we can't go there. Great theologians tell us that we cannot hold God responsible for the evil and pain in our world. Bad things happen and will continue to happen. But they are not the work of God.

In a random universe, God's design is to be present with us and support us through the troubles we face. We can turn to God with confidence who will help us to be strong and who will give us courage through what is difficult and impossible. Even when we make bad choices or mistakes, God will never leave us alone. Whatever path you are on today, know that the energy of God is there too to gently guide, direct and help you with your life journey.
 
 
 
  Sunday
Feb-04
Thought For Today

Our Thought For Today is by Jane Mellett called 'Jesus the Healer'

In today's gospel we read about Jesus' first healing in Mark's Gospel. Jesus hears of the illness of the mother of Simon's wife and goes to her. Due to the purity laws of his time this scene would have been considered controversial. His first healing is of a woman and we are told that he touches her, raises her up; he completely restores her to health. Many of his actions here would be considered taboo.

The 'whole city' was crowded around the door as people wanted to also be healed. What a commotion! Jesus, very early on in his ministry, is clearly a very popular, attractive figure. Jesus is the healer. We might ask ourselves today: who do we know who is in need of healing of any kind? This week, how can we reach out to them?

Another important aspect of this story is that Jesus does not remain comfortable in this house. He keeps moving, keeps going outward. This requires so much energy and an outpouring of love for those in need. Jesus shows us in today's gospel what it takes to stay connected, to re-energise ourselves for our various tasks: quiet time and space for real encounter with God. Even then, the people hunted for him. 'Everyone is searching for you', and still today, everyone is searching. It is up to all of us to help those on this journey, the seekers, the lost and those in need of healing. We cannot break new ground unless we are inwardly free and connected to that divine presence within us and in our world.


Thought For The Week

"When we activate our energy for life, it is like the acorn mobilising itself towards the oak, the mustard seed towards the mighty tree, the dancer towards the dance, the clay towards the hand of the potter. Our sleeping souls uncurl and turn towards the light as every part of our being and even our immune system, is enlivened." ~Martina Lehane Sheehan

Next Thursday is Feb 1st and we will celebrate St Brigid's Day. In the Celtic tradition it is the official start of spring and meteorologically it starts on March 1st. Already we are aware of increasing light each day. Back in December 21st - the shortest day of the year - we had 7 hours and 44 minutes of daylight. On February 1st we will have 9 hours and 6 minutes of daylight in the south of Ireland. That is a significant increase.

St Brigid is famous for her 'St Brigid's Cross'. Using rushes she wove them all into a cross, to remind us that all the different strands of our lives are connected. They are connected not by chance but by the gentle presence of God in our lives. Brigid gathers our rushes of sorrow and blessings, of happiness and pain, tears and laughter, kindness and caring, of voluntary groups and organisations, of families, relations and friends, of schools and hospitals, of work, sport and recreation and all the little things we do with faith, hope and love. Brigid weaves them all with loving hands into something richer and more beautiful. For her God is always at the centre of everything we do, not just the good parts but simply everything.

In her new book called 'Surprised By Fire', Martina Lehane Sheehan talks beautifully about the divine spark that is within each person. It connects in so well with the feast day of St. Brigid. This divine spark can fuel our own happiness and can brighten the lives of those around us. Martina says that once we embark on the journey of finding our flame, life can no longer be seen as a mere haphazard or random string of lucky or unlucky events.

Because of the divine spark, within each person great things can begin to happen or unfold. The divine spark can lie dormant or it can be really active. St Brigid's Day invites us to let it become alive, to let it energise and give us hope. Allow your sleeping soul to uncurl and turn towards the light. When we allow this to happen we are indeed in a very good place.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Feb-03
Thought For The Week

"When we activate our energy for life, it is like the acorn mobilising itself towards the oak, the mustard seed towards the mighty tree, the dancer towards the dance, the clay towards the hand of the potter. Our sleeping souls uncurl and turn towards the light as every part of our being and even our immune system, is enlivened." ~Martina Lehane Sheehan

Next Thursday is Feb 1st and we will celebrate St Brigid's Day. In the Celtic tradition it is the official start of spring and meteorologically it starts on March 1st. Already we are aware of increasing light each day. Back in December 21st - the shortest day of the year - we had 7 hours and 44 minutes of daylight. On February 1st we will have 9 hours and 6 minutes of daylight in the south of Ireland. That is a significant increase.

St Brigid is famous for her 'St Brigid's Cross'. Using rushes she wove them all into a cross, to remind us that all the different strands of our lives are connected. They are connected not by chance but by the gentle presence of God in our lives. Brigid gathers our rushes of sorrow and blessings, of happiness and pain, tears and laughter, kindness and caring, of voluntary groups and organisations, of families, relations and friends, of schools and hospitals, of work, sport and recreation and all the little things we do with faith, hope and love. Brigid weaves them all with loving hands into something richer and more beautiful. For her God is always at the centre of everything we do, not just the good parts but simply everything.

In her new book called 'Surprised By Fire', Martina Lehane Sheehan talks beautifully about the divine spark that is within each person. It connects in so well with the feast day of St. Brigid. This divine spark can fuel our own happiness and can brighten the lives of those around us. Martina says that once we embark on the journey of finding our flame, life can no longer be seen as a mere haphazard or random string of lucky or unlucky events.

Because of the divine spark, within each person great things can begin to happen or unfold. The divine spark can lie dormant or it can be really active. St Brigid's Day invites us to let it become alive, to let it energise and give us hope. Allow your sleeping soul to uncurl and turn towards the light. When we allow this to happen we are indeed in a very good place.
 
 
 
  Friday
Feb-02
Thought For The Week

"When we activate our energy for life, it is like the acorn mobilising itself towards the oak, the mustard seed towards the mighty tree, the dancer towards the dance, the clay towards the hand of the potter. Our sleeping souls uncurl and turn towards the light as every part of our being and even our immune system, is enlivened." ~Martina Lehane Sheehan

Next Thursday is Feb 1st and we will celebrate St Brigid's Day. In the Celtic tradition it is the official start of spring and meteorologically it starts on March 1st. Already we are aware of increasing light each day. Back in December 21st - the shortest day of the year - we had 7 hours and 44 minutes of daylight. On February 1st we will have 9 hours and 6 minutes of daylight in the south of Ireland. That is a significant increase.

St Brigid is famous for her 'St Brigid's Cross'. Using rushes she wove them all into a cross, to remind us that all the different strands of our lives are connected. They are connected not by chance but by the gentle presence of God in our lives. Brigid gathers our rushes of sorrow and blessings, of happiness and pain, tears and laughter, kindness and caring, of voluntary groups and organisations, of families, relations and friends, of schools and hospitals, of work, sport and recreation and all the little things we do with faith, hope and love. Brigid weaves them all with loving hands into something richer and more beautiful. For her God is always at the centre of everything we do, not just the good parts but simply everything.

In her new book called 'Surprised By Fire', Martina Lehane Sheehan talks beautifully about the divine spark that is within each person. It connects in so well with the feast day of St. Brigid. This divine spark can fuel our own happiness and can brighten the lives of those around us. Martina says that once we embark on the journey of finding our flame, life can no longer be seen as a mere haphazard or random string of lucky or unlucky events.

Because of the divine spark, within each person great things can begin to happen or unfold. The divine spark can lie dormant or it can be really active. St Brigid's Day invites us to let it become alive, to let it energise and give us hope. Allow your sleeping soul to uncurl and turn towards the light. When we allow this to happen we are indeed in a very good place.
 
 
 
  Thursday
Feb-01
Thought For The Week

"When we activate our energy for life, it is like the acorn mobilising itself towards the oak, the mustard seed towards the mighty tree, the dancer towards the dance, the clay towards the hand of the potter. Our sleeping souls uncurl and turn towards the light as every part of our being and even our immune system, is enlivened." ~Martina Lehane Sheehan

Today is Feb 1st and we celebrate St Brigid's Day. In the Celtic tradition it is the official start of spring and meteorologically it starts on March 1st. Already we are aware of increasing light each day. Back in December 21st - the shortest day of the year - we had 7 hours and 44 minutes of daylight. On February 1st we have 9 hours and 6 minutes of daylight in the south of Ireland. That is a significant increase.

St Brigid is famous for her 'St Brigid's Cross'. Using rushes she wove them all into a cross, to remind us that all the different strands of our lives are connected. They are connected not by chance but by the gentle presence of God in our lives. Brigid gathers our rushes of sorrow and blessings, of happiness and pain, tears and laughter, kindness and caring, of voluntary groups and organisations, of families, relations and friends, of schools and hospitals, of work, sport and recreation and all the little things we do with faith, hope and love. Brigid weaves them all with loving hands into something richer and more beautiful. For her God is always at the centre of everything we do, not just the good parts but simply everything.

In her new book called 'Surprised By Fire', Martina Lehane Sheehan talks beautifully about the divine spark that is within each person. It connects in so well with the feast day of St. Brigid. This divine spark can fuel our own happiness and can brighten the lives of those around us. Martina says that once we embark on the journey of finding our flame, life can no longer be seen as a mere haphazard or random string of lucky or unlucky events.

Because of the divine spark, within each person great things can begin to happen or unfold. The divine spark can lie dormant or it can be really active. St Brigid's Day invites us to let it become alive, to let it energise and give us hope. Allow your sleeping soul to uncurl and turn towards the light. When we allow this to happen we are indeed in a very good place.
 
 

 

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