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LISTING THOUGHT ARCHIVE

  January
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Listing January - 2019
 
  Thursday
Jan-31
Thought For The Week

"I sought to hear the voice of God and climbed to the highest steeple, but God declared: 'Go down again - I dwell among the people'." ~John Henry Newman

Last Sunday night many people got up early to see the eclipse of the moon which peaked at 5a.m. The effect of the eclipse created an orange glow which is called a "Blood moon". The moon has fascinated people for thousands of years. We know it has a strong pull on our planet earth, creating the ebb and flow of our tides. Another interesting aspect of the moon is that there is one side of the moon that we never see. They call it 'the dark side of the moon' and it is the side of the moon where the sun never shines. It is the side of the moon which faces the cold, black expanse of space.

The 'dark side of the moon' also has spiritual meaning as well. It can happen when a person of faith experiences darkness and uncertainty. Instead of God being an anchor in their lives, they now experience darkness and emptiness. Old and trusted certainties are now questioned. What once was a steady source of strength and consolation is now empty. It can happen over a period of time or quite suddenly. Events like the loss of loved one through death or an unexpected illness of a family member can be overwhelming and can be the trigger for the winter of the soul.

Spiritual writers from all walks of life agree that this happens occasionally and does not mean it is going to last forever. It is difficult when it happens, it can be confusing and frustrating. But every winter is always followed by spring, growth, renewal and new beginnings. The constant message of scripture is that God is not on the rooftops or up on steeples but is very much with people as they are. God is with us in the sunshine but very much with us in our darkness too. The 'dark side of the moon' can represent so many difficulties and struggles in our lives. Whatever the darkness may be God is there holding the light for us and helping us through one step at a time.

Thought For The Week is updated each Monday

 
 
 
  Wednesday
Jan-30
Thought For The Week

"I sought to hear the voice of God and climbed to the highest steeple, but God declared: 'Go down again - I dwell among the people'." ~John Henry Newman

Last Sunday night many people got up early to see the eclipse of the moon which peaked at 5a.m. The effect of the eclipse created an orange glow which is called a "Blood moon". The moon has fascinated people for thousands of years. We know it has a strong pull on our planet earth, creating the ebb and flow of our tides. Another interesting aspect of the moon is that there is one side of the moon that we never see. They call it 'the dark side of the moon' and it is the side of the moon where the sun never shines. It is the side of the moon which faces the cold, black expanse of space.

The 'dark side of the moon' also has spiritual meaning as well. It can happen when a person of faith experiences darkness and uncertainty. Instead of God being an anchor in their lives, they now experience darkness and emptiness. Old and trusted certainties are now questioned. What once was a steady source of strength and consolation is now empty. It can happen over a period of time or quite suddenly. Events like the loss of loved one through death or an unexpected illness of a family member can be overwhelming and can be the trigger for the winter of the soul.

Spiritual writers from all walks of life agree that this happens occasionally and does not mean it is going to last forever. It is difficult when it happens, it can be confusing and frustrating. But every winter is always followed by spring, growth, renewal and new beginnings. The constant message of scripture is that God is not on the rooftops or up on steeples but is very much with people as they are. God is with us in the sunshine but very much with us in our darkness too. The 'dark side of the moon' can represent so many difficulties and struggles in our lives. Whatever the darkness may be God is there holding the light for us and helping us through one step at a time.

Thought For The Week is updated each Monday

Thought For The Week

'You cannot believe in God until you believe in yourself.' ~Swami Vivekananda

It would be great if there was a simple formula in our search for God. We are often unsure where to start and how to begin. Our searches are many, from our local church, attending Mass and saying prayers that vary from traditional to deeply personal. Some find that these simply are not for them and search elsewhere. These searches include finding God in the humdrum of daily life, music, reading, reflection, meditation, relaxation and so on. Whatever and wherever our search, it is good that we are searching.

This coming week marks a week of prayer for Christian Unity. It happens every year during the third week of January. The common link between different faiths and religions is that any connection with God can only be built, if we believe in ourselves first of all. This means believing in our own uniqueness, believing in our special gifts and talents, believing in how special we are and so much more. Believing in ourselves is something we can struggle at times with but it is probably one of the most important things we can do each day.

As we begin Christian Unity week it is good to know that there are so many overlaps and so much common ground. So much energy can be wasted trying to highlight differences and 'that we are better than you'. It is the same loving God we follow and during Christian Unity week we pray for guidance, direction, light and hope in everything we do.
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Jan-29
Thought For The Week

"I sought to hear the voice of God and climbed to the highest steeple, but God declared: 'Go down again - I dwell among the people'." ~John Henry Newman

Last Sunday night many people got up early to see the eclipse of the moon which peaked at 5a.m. The effect of the eclipse created an orange glow which is called a "Blood moon". The moon has fascinated people for thousands of years. We know it has a strong pull on our planet earth, creating the ebb and flow of our tides. Another interesting aspect of the moon is that there is one side of the moon that we never see. They call it 'the dark side of the moon' and it is the side of the moon where the sun never shines. It is the side of the moon which faces the cold, black expanse of space.

The 'dark side of the moon' also has spiritual meaning as well. It can happen when a person of faith experiences darkness and uncertainty. Instead of God being an anchor in their lives, they now experience darkness and emptiness. Old and trusted certainties are now questioned. What once was a steady source of strength and consolation is now empty. It can happen over a period of time or quite suddenly. Events like the loss of loved one through death or an unexpected illness of a family member can be overwhelming and can be the trigger for the winter of the soul.

Spiritual writers from all walks of life agree that this happens occasionally and does not mean it is going to last forever. It is difficult when it happens, it can be confusing and frustrating. But every winter is always followed by spring, growth, renewal and new beginnings. The constant message of scripture is that God is not on the rooftops or up on steeples but is very much with people as they are. God is with us in the sunshine but very much with us in our darkness too. The 'dark side of the moon' can represent so many difficulties and struggles in our lives. Whatever the darkness may be God is there holding the light for us and helping us through one step at a time.

Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Monday
Jan-28
Thought For The Week

"I sought to hear the voice of God and climbed to the highest steeple, but God declared: 'Go down again - I dwell among the people'." ~John Henry Newman

Last Sunday night many people got up early to see the eclipse of the moon which peaked at 5a.m. The effect of the eclipse created an orange glow which is called a "Blood moon". The moon has fascinated people for thousands of years. We know it has a strong pull on our planet earth, creating the ebb and flow of our tides. Another interesting aspect of the moon is that there is one side of the moon that we never see. They call it 'the dark side of the moon' and it is the side of the moon where the sun never shines. It is the side of the moon which faces the cold, black expanse of space.

The 'dark side of the moon' also has spiritual meaning as well. It can happen when a person of faith experiences darkness and uncertainty. Instead of God being an anchor in their lives, they now experience darkness and emptiness. Old and trusted certainties are now questioned. What once was a steady source of strength and consolation is now empty. It can happen over a period of time or quite suddenly. Events like the loss of loved one through death or an unexpected illness of a family member can be overwhelming and can be the trigger for the winter of the soul.

Spiritual writers from all walks of life agree that this happens occasionally and does not mean it is going to last forever. It is difficult when it happens, it can be confusing and frustrating. But every winter is always followed by spring, growth, renewal and new beginnings. The constant message of scripture is that God is not on the rooftops or up on steeples but is very much with people as they are. God is with us in the sunshine but very much with us in our darkness too. The 'dark side of the moon' can represent so many difficulties and struggles in our lives. Whatever the darkness may be God is there holding the light for us and helping us through one step at a time.

Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Sunday
Jan-27
Thought For The Week

'You cannot believe in God until you believe in yourself.' ~Swami Vivekananda

It would be great if there was a simple formula in our search for God. We are often unsure where to start and how to begin. Our searches are many, from our local church, attending Mass and saying prayers that vary from traditional to deeply personal. Some find that these simply are not for them and search elsewhere. These searches include finding God in the humdrum of daily life, music, reading, reflection, meditation, relaxation and so on. Whatever and wherever our search, it is good that we are searching.

This coming week marks a week of prayer for Christian Unity. It happens every year during the third week of January. The common link between different faiths and religions is that any connection with God can only be built, if we believe in ourselves first of all. This means believing in our own uniqueness, believing in our special gifts and talents, believing in how special we are and so much more. Believing in ourselves is something we can struggle at times with but it is probably one of the most important things we can do each day.

As we begin Christian Unity week it is good to know that there are so many overlaps and so much common ground. So much energy can be wasted trying to highlight differences and 'that we are better than you'. It is the same loving God we follow and during Christian Unity week we pray for guidance, direction, light and hope in everything we do.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Jan-26
Thought For The Week

'You cannot believe in God until you believe in yourself.' ~Swami Vivekananda

It would be great if there was a simple formula in our search for God. We are often unsure where to start and how to begin. Our searches are many, from our local church, attending Mass and saying prayers that vary from traditional to deeply personal. Some find that these simply are not for them and search elsewhere. These searches include finding God in the humdrum of daily life, music, reading, reflection, meditation, relaxation and so on. Whatever and wherever our search, it is good that we are searching.

This coming week marks a week of prayer for Christian Unity. It happens every year during the third week of January. The common link between different faiths and religions is that any connection with God can only be built, if we believe in ourselves first of all. This means believing in our own uniqueness, believing in our special gifts and talents, believing in how special we are and so much more. Believing in ourselves is something we can struggle at times with but it is probably one of the most important things we can do each day.

As we begin Christian Unity week it is good to know that there are so many overlaps and so much common ground. So much energy can be wasted trying to highlight differences and 'that we are better than you'. It is the same loving God we follow and during Christian Unity week we pray for guidance, direction, light and hope in everything we do.
 
 
 
  Thursday
Jan-24
Thought For The Week

'You cannot believe in God until you believe in yourself.' ~Swami Vivekananda

It would be great if there was a simple formula in our search for God. We are often unsure where to start and how to begin. Our searches are many, from our local church, attending Mass and saying prayers that vary from traditional to deeply personal. Some find that these simply are not for them and search elsewhere. These searches include finding God in the humdrum of daily life, music, reading, reflection, meditation, relaxation and so on. Whatever and wherever our search, it is good that we are searching.

This coming week marks a week of prayer for Christian Unity. It happens every year during the third week of January. The common link between different faiths and religions is that any connection with God can only be built, if we believe in ourselves first of all. This means believing in our own uniqueness, believing in our special gifts and talents, believing in how special we are and so much more. Believing in ourselves is something we can struggle at times with but it is probably one of the most important things we can do each day.

As we begin Christian Unity week it is good to know that there are so many overlaps and so much common ground. So much energy can be wasted trying to highlight differences and 'that we are better than you'. It is the same loving God we follow and during Christian Unity week we pray for guidance, direction, light and hope in everything we do.
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Jan-22
Thought For The Week

'You cannot believe in God until you believe in yourself.' ~Swami Vivekananda

It would be great if there was a simple formula in our search for God. We are often unsure where to start and how to begin. Our searches are many, from our local church, attending Mass and saying prayers that vary from traditional to deeply personal. Some find that these simply are not for them and search elsewhere. These searches include finding God in the humdrum of daily life, music, reading, reflection, meditation, relaxation and so on. Whatever and wherever our search, it is good that we are searching.

This coming week marks a week of prayer for Christian Unity. It happens every year during the third week of January. The common link between different faiths and religions is that any connection with God can only be built, if we believe in ourselves first of all. This means believing in our own uniqueness, believing in our special gifts and talents, believing in how special we are and so much more. Believing in ourselves is something we can struggle at times with but it is probably one of the most important things we can do each day.

As we begin Christian Unity week it is good to know that there are so many overlaps and so much common ground. So much energy can be wasted trying to highlight differences and 'that we are better than you'. It is the same loving God we follow and during Christian Unity week we pray for guidance, direction, light and hope in everything we do.
 
 
 
  Sunday
Jan-20
Our Thought For Today is by Jane Mellett 'The First of His Signs'

This is a familiar story, rich in symbolism. It is the first 'sign' recorded in John's Gospel. These 'signs' in John's Gospel are miracle stories but John prefers to use the term 'sign,' as they point to something far more than just the miracle itself. John used these signs to encourage belief in his readers but they are also an invitation for us to understand something more of how God operates in our lives.

Jesus transforms the water which would be used for the Jewish purification rite. He takes something used to give life to people, and transforms it into something which brings joy, celebration and new life to the party. There are many messages we can take from this account: the ability of God to transform our lives, to transform that which is dead and stale. The abundance of wine (approx. 700 litres!) is a significant reminder of the abundance of God's love for us, beyond our comprehension.

We could also focus on the role of Mary in this Gospel - she is the one who notices, she is attentive to the needs of those around her and brings this concern to Jesus. We might pray today that we too may be able to notice, to see, to intervene when we are faced with situations that need attention. This may be a situation of injustice or it may be a situation where something in our own lives or in our church has become dead and stale and is in desperate need of new wine.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Jan-19
Thought For The Week

'In any tragedy there is always a wonderful outbreak of care and help. Maybe God is the spirit of love and goodness that inspires people at a time like this. Could God be the one who suffers rather than the one who controls?' ~Tony Flannery

As chaplain to a big secondary school I get asked many different questions. One common question is why God allows so many tragedies to happen? My explanation is God never deliberately causes a tragedy to happen. That would be a cruel and harsh God. Then I'm asked if God is not the cause then why doesn't God stop or prevent it happening? Again this is difficult to answer. We often speak about God's love for us, who only wants the best for us and who journeys with us every step of the way. In any tragedy God feels our hurt, pain, anger, grief and even abandonment. God is just as helpless because God can't prevent or stop something. But nothing can stop God's spirit of love and goodness in the middle of any tragedy.
 
 
 
  Friday
Jan-18
Thought For The Week

'In any tragedy there is always a wonderful outbreak of care and help. Maybe God is the spirit of love and goodness that inspires people at a time like this. Could God be the one who suffers rather than the one who controls?' ~Tony Flannery

As chaplain to a big secondary school I get asked many different questions. One common question is why God allows so many tragedies to happen? My explanation is God never deliberately causes a tragedy to happen. That would be a cruel and harsh God. Then I'm asked if God is not the cause then why doesn't God stop or prevent it happening? Again this is difficult to answer. We often speak about God's love for us, who only wants the best for us and who journeys with us every step of the way. In any tragedy God feels our hurt, pain, anger, grief and even abandonment. God is just as helpless because God can't prevent or stop something. But nothing can stop God's spirit of love and goodness in the middle of any tragedy.
 
 
 
  Thursday
Jan-17
Thought For The Week

'In any tragedy there is always a wonderful outbreak of care and help. Maybe God is the spirit of love and goodness that inspires people at a time like this. Could God be the one who suffers rather than the one who controls?' ~Tony Flannery

As chaplain to a big secondary school I get asked many different questions. One common question is why God allows so many tragedies to happen? My explanation is God never deliberately causes a tragedy to happen. That would be a cruel and harsh God. Then I'm asked if God is not the cause then why doesn't God stop or prevent it happening? Again this is difficult to answer. We often speak about God's love for us, who only wants the best for us and who journeys with us every step of the way. In any tragedy God feels our hurt, pain, anger, grief and even abandonment. God is just as helpless because God can't prevent or stop something. But nothing can stop God's spirit of love and goodness in the middle of any tragedy.
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Jan-16
Thought For The Week

'In any tragedy there is always a wonderful outbreak of care and help. Maybe God is the spirit of love and goodness that inspires people at a time like this. Could God be the one who suffers rather than the one who controls?' ~Tony Flannery

As chaplain to a big secondary school I get asked many different questions. One common question is why God allows so many tragedies to happen? My explanation is God never deliberately causes a tragedy to happen. That would be a cruel and harsh God. Then I'm asked if God is not the cause then why doesn't God stop or prevent it happening? Again this is difficult to answer. We often speak about God's love for us, who only wants the best for us and who journeys with us every step of the way. In any tragedy God feels our hurt, pain, anger, grief and even abandonment. God is just as helpless because God can't prevent or stop something. But nothing can stop God's spirit of love and goodness in the middle of any tragedy.
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Jan-15
Thought For The Week

'In any tragedy there is always a wonderful outbreak of care and help. Maybe God is the spirit of love and goodness that inspires people at a time like this. Could God be the one who suffers rather than the one who controls?' ~Tony Flannery

As chaplain to a big secondary school I get asked many different questions. One common question is why God allows so many tragedies to happen? My explanation is God never deliberately causes a tragedy to happen. That would be a cruel and harsh God. Then I'm asked if God is not the cause then why doesn't God stop or prevent it happening? Again this is difficult to answer. We often speak about God's love for us, who only wants the best for us and who journeys with us every step of the way. In any tragedy God feels our hurt, pain, anger, grief and even abandonment. God is just as helpless because God can't prevent or stop something. But nothing can stop God's spirit of love and goodness in the middle of any tragedy.
 
 
 
  Monday
Jan-14
Thought For The Week

'In any tragedy there is always a wonderful outbreak of care and help. Maybe God is the spirit of love and goodness that inspires people at a time like this. Could God be the one who suffers rather than the one who controls?' ~Tony Flannery

As chaplain to a big secondary school I get asked many different questions. One common question is why God allows so many tragedies to happen? My explanation is God never deliberately causes a tragedy to happen. That would be a cruel and harsh God. Then I'm asked if God is not the cause then why doesn't God stop or prevent it happening? Again this is difficult to answer. We often speak about God's love for us, who only wants the best for us and who journeys with us every step of the way. In any tragedy God feels our hurt, pain, anger, grief and even abandonment. God is just as helpless because God can't prevent or stop something. But nothing can stop God's spirit of love and goodness in the middle of any tragedy.
 
 
 
  Sunday
Jan-13
 
 
 
  Monday
Jan-07
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Jan-01
 
 

 

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